Shutter Island

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Posted February 19, 2010 by in

Quick Stats

Genre: drama, thriller
 
Director: Martin Scorsese
 
MPAA Rating: R
 
Actors: Leonardo DiCaprio, Emily Mortimer, Mark Ruffalo
 
Length: 138 minutes
 
Release Date: 2/19/2010
 
Studio: Paramount Pictures, Phoenix Pictures, Sikelia Productions, Appian Way
 
 
What We Thought

The impeccable Scorsese is clearly having a ball, tapping into the kind of stark, Cold War era fear that runs through the most profound of thrillers.

by Nick Rodriguez
Full Article

Up for having a master filmmaker mess with your head? Then Shutter Island is the movie for you.

Channeling his inner Hitchcock, Martin Scorsese taps into the Gothic hipness of Dennis Lehane’s psychological mindbender. The equally game Leonardo DiCaprio stars as U.S. Marshall Teddy Daniels, summoned, along with his new partner, played by Mark Ruffalo, to an eerie offshore psychiatric hospital when one of the patients, a brilliant and beautiful young murderess, has gone missing during a hurricane. Teddy is onto the weirdness of the place early on; Scorsese, through a marvelously static opening sequence, enhanced with Robbie Robertson’s amazing score, sets us up for some bizarro stuff, too. There’s more going on in here than meets the eye, or is there?

The impeccable Scorsese is clearly having a ball, tapping into the kind of stark, Cold War era fear that runs through the most profound of thrillers. Everything is remote, suspicious, yet nothing clear or distinctly threatening. As he weaves through a colorful cast of characters to interview about the case, Teddy becomes more and more muddled. He is, after all, trying to get the truth out of crazy people. Isn’t he?

Unfortunately, the fun fizzles after the story runs on just a beat too long. We discover the truth and, as written in the original novel, that truth is nowhere near as entertaining as is the trip getting there.

Still, there is a lot to enjoy here. For the most part, the savvy production values shine. And the supporting cast, including the terrific Max von Sydow, Patricia Clarkson, Emily Mortimer, Michelle Williams, and Ben Kingsley, are right on the money. Not earning co-starring credits, but delivering dandy work all the same, are Jackie Earle Haley and Robin Bartlett. While we, and the movie, are exhausted by the end, the ride to it is a real trip.


About the Author

Nick Rodriguez


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